Adam Homo offers new sports literature class in the fall

Language+Arts+teacher+Adam+Homo+and+his+freshmen+read+%22The+Glass+Menagerie%2C%22+on+Friday%2C+Feb.+22.+Homo+is+encouraging+students+to+sign+up+for+his+new+Language+Arts+elective+called+Sports+Literature.
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Adam Homo offers new sports literature class in the fall

Language Arts teacher Adam Homo and his freshmen read

Language Arts teacher Adam Homo and his freshmen read "The Glass Menagerie," on Friday, Feb. 22. Homo is encouraging students to sign up for his new Language Arts elective called Sports Literature.

Jahlea Douglas

Language Arts teacher Adam Homo and his freshmen read "The Glass Menagerie," on Friday, Feb. 22. Homo is encouraging students to sign up for his new Language Arts elective called Sports Literature.

Jahlea Douglas

Jahlea Douglas

Language Arts teacher Adam Homo and his freshmen read "The Glass Menagerie," on Friday, Feb. 22. Homo is encouraging students to sign up for his new Language Arts elective called Sports Literature.

Jahlea Douglas, Editor-in-chief

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Veteran teacher Adam Homo is teaching a sports literature course in the fall. Read this Q & A to find out more. You might want to take it!

GENESIS: What is Sports Literature?

Adam Homo: Sports Literature encompasses anything sports related. The “text” can be a book like “The Contender,”  a comedy sketch about sports like Abbott and Costello’s “Who’s on First,” poetry about sports like “Casey at the Bat,” and movies like “Eight Men Out.” A sports literature class is, in a nutshell, a chance to discuss anything and everything that is sports related.

G: Is everyone welcomed to take this course?

AH: This class is open for students in grades 9-12. It counts as an elective credit.

G: How many students can take this class?

AH: I am hoping many would like to take this course. I am used to bigger classes, so I would expect 25-30 students will be enrolled in a section.

G: Why did you choose to teach this course?

AH: Well, when I was a student, my father taught a Newbery Award class. Students chose 8-10 Newbery Award winning books to read and discuss with the class. I also took my father’s southern literature course, which was interesting. We got to read a lot of southern literature and discuss it. Many think of reading as boring and dry, but reading can be quite enjoyable based upon the subject matter. On a side note, I am reading the “Boys’ of Columbia High” to my son, and each of these books has the main characters (sports enthusiasts, all), solve crimes while they compete in sport to uphold the honor of their city.

G: For students who take this class, what is required of them?

AH: The class will follow the Indiana Department of Education’s guidelines. However, I only foresee one three page essay with much more discussion and short writing. I think it will be fun to look at the different ways sport has influenced American society. It also will be fun to see how sport is used as a way to build understanding in American culture.

G: Is this course just for athletes?

AH: This course is open to everybody! If anyone has a passing interest in sports or is just curious about sports, this would be an excellent class.

G: If someone wants to join what do you recommend?

AH: If you would like to become a student in the Sports Literature class, see your counselor ASAP and get into the class. I am most excited about this course.